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Certificates On Blockchain

Get your Certificates Anywhere Using BLOCKCHAIN as a SERVICE

Aratos offers a secure and manageable blockchain-based platform that enables institutions to securely generate, authenticate and retrieve programmable documents.

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Demo

Certificates can be produced via two approaches: using personalized pre-defined templates or fully customized templates.

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Quality Services

Each certification is verified and issued using Blockchain technology and can be acknowledged as a genuine copy of the original transcript.

  • + Easy Remote Access/Management
  • + Support for multiple departments and/or services in an organization
  • + Access from any device connected to internet (PC, mobile, tablet)
  • + Improved User Experience
  • + 100% Transparency of Certificates
  • + Fraud Prevention
  • + GDPR compliance
  • + Reduction of costs
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Issue Certificates in 3 steps!

Step 1.

Click on "Add new Certificate"

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Step 2.

Choose the type of certificate you wish to issue and fill out all the fields.

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Step 3.

Click on "Add Certificate" and you are done!

The user for whom you have issued the certificate can now find it on his dashboard to download it!

Quotes from our Users

An amazing platform streamlining and securing all my document needs! @EILD."

User1

Fast, efficient and easy to understand. This platform is everything a certificate issuing compay needs! @Platani."

User2

Issuing certificates never felt so secure and easy before! Amazing job! @Georgakopoulos."

User3

Contact Us

Send us an email for any question you may have and we will get back to you as soon as possible!

FrequentlyAskedQuestions

The short answer is no. What is stored on the blockchain is a 1-way hash. This makes it useful only for verification, i.e. you can hash a certificate and compare to what is on the blockchain. And given what is on the blockchain, the original data cannot be feasibly recovered. This makes it easy for a recipient to reveal a certificate only to intended third parties.

Yes, the blockchain is an immutable and distributed store of transactions, with each block building upon the last. When a certificate is issued, its data is compressed into a hash and logged on the blockchain. This generates a “receipt” that can always be checked at a later date. The verification service validates the signature of the issuer and the certificate data; it also ensures that the certificate status has not expired or been revoked.The friendly version of the certificate displayed online may shift visually, depending on the device displaying it. For instance, it may appear one way in a mobile app and slightly differently in a web browser. While this display may be optimized for different circumstances, the data within the certificate can never be changed.

The friendly display of certificates could be spoofed to trick a non-technical viewer. This is why it is important to use a separate verification service when circumstances are important. While the issuer may include a friendly verification button below a certificate, the most secure way to ensure a certificate is valid is to use a separate verification service to check the blockchain. That cannot be spoofed.

Certificates are immutable and cannot be updated. We recommend defining batches as a logical grouping of recipients that are not expected to change, e.g. “Issuer 2021” vs “Issuer.” The issuer may revoke certificates that have mistakes, or, if they simply left out an eligible recipient, the issuer may issue another batch.

Issuers must handle recipient information with care. In some previous deployments, participants (issuers and recipients) have chosen to make the original certificates easily discoverable through a certificate web site. This is because the certificates didn’t contain private or sensitive information, and the recipients wanted to promote their certificates. However, certificates containing personal information, such as the recipient’s address, should be shielded from public disclosure. So, the basic implementation can omit this certificate browsing capability. This is similar to the Proof of Existence approach, which avoids disclosing any information unless the recipient chooses to do so.

A Lto transaction is determined by the size of the transaction and the transaction fee. Blockchain Certificates transaction sizes are static and small – they add a single fixed-size of output on top of a standard single-input, single-output transaction. This is true no matter the number of certificates in a batch. So the cost to issue a batch of Blockchain Certificates is largely influenced by the transaction fee, which is a fee paid to miners to ensure timely mining of transactions. The recommended fee changes over time; current recommended values can be obtained from ‘To get in next block’ of Recommended Lto Network Transaction Fees. In the cert-issuer project, the transaction fee is configurable. The default value was selected as a higher value to reduce wait time. This setting can be overridden in the config file to reduce the cost, but it may result in long waits.

BlockchainCertificates has a claims-orientation to identity. This means that identity is always self-curated by the individual through the claims about themselves that they disclose. All claims have to be assessed in some manner. Those claims that are blockchain verifiable are guaranteed to represent what was originally issued. So, BlockchainCertificates is not attempting to prove identity directly. In other words, this solution does not certify the mapping of public keys to individuals or organizations. Further, there is no registration process in this system, so any issuer may issue certificates and recipients may provide any Bitcoin address. However, it is in the issuer’s and recipient’s interest to provide public addresses they own, because this is the only way either can demonstrate ownership of or revoke certificates.

The verification process answers questions about the certificate’s integrity and validity: The verification process ensures that the certificate you see wasn’t tampered with by comparing hashes with what is registered on the blockchain. It ensures the certificate wasn’t revoked through a convention that relies on spending transaction outputs.

This codebase allows the issuer and the recipient to make cryptographically strong claims: if either party owns a certificate’s issued-by or issued-to address, then they can also sign a statement with their corresponding private key. Only the owner of the corresponding private key can do this. The wallet (mobile app) and issuer software will provide a capacity to prove ownership if requested. Currently, the issuer provides a link to their credentials in the certificate, and the standard validation process performs a cryptographic check that the public key at that link actually signed the certificate.

This codebase allows the issuer and the recipient to make cryptographically strong claims: if either party owns a certificate’s issued-by or issued-to address, then they can also sign a statement with their corresponding private key. Only the owner of the corresponding private key can do this. The wallet (mobile app) and issuer software will provide a capacity to prove ownership if requested. Currently, the issuer provides a link to their credentials in the certificate, and the standard validation process performs a cryptographic check that the public key at that link actually signed the certificate.

Each certificate can have a 'template' field. This field identifies the template to be used for that certificate. Once you are a recognized issuer, you may submit a pull request at our GitHub repository to add your certificate template to the verification site.

Yes, the certificate file can trivially be duplicated. However, the recipient's name in the certificate cannot be altered without failing our verification process. Thus it is extremely important that the person doing the verification ensures that the recipient indicated in the certificate is actually the entity presenting the certificate.

Printing the certificate discards all the advanced cryptographic protections we have built into BlockchainCertificates, hence printed certificates are not to be considered authentic.

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About Us

Interdisciplinary Company Team with experience in business modeling, IT & Security Experience in the creation of Blockchain solutions since 2013 Ready-on blockchain modules for different business sectors Worldwide Coverage and Network Utilizes LTO NETWORK platform, one of the best Top20 Blockchain Platforms